Calgary company Dissolve creates the perfect (fake) U.S. campaign ad

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Screenshot from the Dissolve video.

This is a lede. It’s meant to draw you into the story by telling you what you’re about to read.

Often we’ll toss in some active words like rammed, or ploughed, or engulfed so that you don’t turn your infant-level attention span elsewhere.

In this case, we want you to be interested in a story about a mock presidential campaign video created by Calgary stock video company Dissolve. We’ve embedded it below so that you’ll scroll down more.

Perhaps you’d like a subhead to draw you in further.

Excitement follows

Taking a cue from the dramatic and hokey ads that litter U.S. television screens during elections, Dissolve cobbled together video footage from its vast collection in order to offer a template of sorts for the Donald Trumps, Hillary Clintons and Bernie Sanders of the world.

READ THE REST AT CBC CALGARY.

Calgary’s music scene and how it shapes us

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Photo by: Bernard Bodo, EXIT photo team

Some speculate that music is the reason humans are what humans are.

That the sounds of voice and eventually instrument over the millennia helped form the communities that became the societies, that allowed us to grow into the dominant species on the planet.

As famed cultural critic George Steiner put it, there is no community on this planet that does not have music — music being far more universal than language.

Our people

Music shapes community. It shapes cultural (and counter-cultural) identities within societies. It is tribal. It helps us to find “our people” and shape our world view.

From the snarky guy at the record store to the acclaimed pianist taking the stage at the Jack Singer; from the keen all-ages promoter hyped up on the local music scene to the guy putting up posters along 17th Avenue — music and the social scenes that develop around it mean more than just beats and bleeps and bangs.

When I was in high school and regularly going to all-ages punk shows, my dad would often ask in that concerned parental way what I had in common with my friends. The answer was almost always music. That didn’t make much sense to him.

READ THE REST AT CBC CALGARY

Bar philosophy: What Calgary’s drinking holes say about our city

 

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Bartender Jasmine Gilbert pours a pint at Lynwood Station pub, a favourite haunt for thirsty Ogden locals. (Drew Anderson)

When a certain magic takes hold, a bar becomes a memory palace that stands apart from other social spaces. It captures our imaginations, tells our stories.

Bars are places where we make and keep friends, form community and, even if we don’t realize it, bars shape how we think of ourselves.

You can also get liquored up there, which helps.

Calgary is a city of iconic bars, and a wasteland for many more. Names people know, places you want to see and be seen.

Each one unique, and when one closes, a little something in us shuts, too.

Bar philosophy (yeah, it’s a thing)

Think of the King Eddy, the Shamrock, the Cecil, and so many before them: The Republik, Westward Club, The Night Gallery or the Electric Avenue strip.

 Each a different place, with a different crowd and a different vibe. All gone.

You can no longer sit in one of these places and say, “This is where B.B. King came to play after his show at the Saddledome.”

You can’t point to the chair next to you and say, “Ralph Klein decided to run for premier while drinking there.”

You can’t say, “I saw Nirvana play on this little stage,” or “Your mother and I conceived you after a night here.”

Richard Ocejo, a sociology professor at City University of New York, has spent a lot of time thinking about bars, ever since he stumbled into a gentrifying dive in New York City’s Bowery district.

READ THE REST AT CBC CALGARY.